• 12 – 14 Pound Whole Packer Brisket
  • Worcestershire sauce
  • Bald Man Back Rub
  • Bald Man Rub
  • 1/2 cup Apple Juice
  • 1/2 Cup Bourbon
  • 1 Beef Bouillon Cube
  • Store your brisket in the refrigerator until you are ready to start trimming.  Remove any silver skin or excess fat from the flat muscle. Trim down the large fat section until it is a smooth transition between the point and the flat. Trim and excessive or loose meat and fat from the point. Flip the brisket over and trim the top fat cap to about 1/4 of an inch thickness across the surface of the brisket.
  • Lightly coat the brisket with Worcestershire sauce.  Season the brisket generously with the Bald Man Back Rub, then lightly season with the Bald Man Rub.  Typically, we use twice as much Bald Man Back Rub as the Bald Man Rub. Leave at room temperature for 15 minutes before putting on the smoker.  While waiting, combine the apple juice, bourbon and bouillon cube in a small sauce pan and bring to a boil over medium heat (until cube melts).  Let cool and transfer to spray bottle.   
  • Preheat your smoker to 225 degrees.  Place the brisket on the smoker. Close the lid and smoke until an internal thermometer reads 165 degrees F (usually takes around 8 hours).  Spray the brisket every 30-45 minutes with the bourbon/apple juice mixture.  
  • On a large work surface, roll out a big piece of butcher paper (or foil) and center your brisket in the middle.  Pour the remaining bourbon/apple juice mixture over the brisket. Wrap the brisket by folding edge over edge, creating a leak proof seal all the way around.  Return the wrapped brisket to the smoker, 
  • Close the lid on the smoker and, maintaining 225 degrees F, continue cooking until the internal temperature of the brisket reaches 202 degrees F in the thickest part of the meat (takes anywhere from 5-8 hours).
  • Remove the brisket to a large cutting board and allow to rest for at least 1 hour before slicing (you can wrap in foil and place in a cooler for up to 4 hours if needed). Slice both the point and the flat against the grain with a sharp knife.